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Nicholas Restivo » “Hai Fegato?”

“Hai Fegato?”

 

2010 Interaction Design Lab, IUAV, Venice
Profs. Philip Tabor and Gillian Crampton Smith
Designed by: Isabella Balzano, Alice Mortaro, Nicholas Restivo.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

‘Hai Fegato?’ (“I dare you!”) is an application for mobile devices which allows people (who have never met before) to live out-of-the-ordinary experiences: through a series of challenges (which range from harmless activities like meatball eating contests to more dangerous ones like breaking into historic abandoned buildings) they push themselves and each other to the limit.

 

This short promo film (2:50)  gives an idea of the mood and general context of the app:

 

The project aims to create a community of hard-core individuals who, through a series of challenges, push themselves and each other to the limit.

“Hai Fegato?” allows users to upload challenges, and participate in challenges uploaded by other users. For every challenge that users pass successfully, his/her rank position advances; they also receive a ‘victory patch’ to put on their “Hai Fegato?” t-shirt (which serves as a ‘military uniform’). After a challenge has taken place, users can check their rank position and upload photos/videos to the challenge info page.

 

Below is a detailed flowmap of the interaction (click here to view a high quality pdf):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Custom “Hai Fegato?” map of Venice:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the graphics, our research focused on three themes:

- futurism;
- punk;
- biker clubs.

These all embody a feeling we thought would appeal to potential users of this app: strength and power, dynamism and the need to live beyond society’s rules and restrictions.

The bright colors, tone and contrast led us to choose a blood-spatter red background; the choice of a very linear typeface comes from a desire for clarity. The use of white and orange supports the idea of contrast.

The stylized icons, for the graphics as well as for the victory patches, brings to mind the military world, with its order and ranks.

More info: here.